My Journey to Destination Theatre

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Posing before my first ever dance recital

I started performing, in both dance and theatre, at a young age. I was painfully shy and hated the spotlight. I was probably the child on stage who fidgeted with her hands and stared at her feet.

However, at some point during my years of performing, I grew to love the warmth of the stage lights and the gaze of the audience. Although I was shy, when I was performing I could be someone else. I did not like to approach new people but the character I played was loud and self-assured. I crossed my arms in front of me when I walked but as a dancer, my head was held high and my movements were graceful.

I once came across the phrase, “sometimes I can hear my bones straining under the weight of all the lives I’m not living”. This line is from Jonathan Safran Foer’s Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close. I had never read the novel so I did not know the context of the line but reading it reminded me of performing. When I was performing, I could lead all the lives I was not living. I could be the young, stubborn Prince of Denmark or channel the wild fun of Rent’s Mimi singing “Out Tonight”.

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My high school performance of Hamlet (when I slammed the poison cup down with so much force it broke in two)
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Dancing and lip-syncing to “Out Tonight” at a dance competition

I continued dancing and acting until I graduated high school and along the way, I learned to translate my confidence on stage to real life. Today, I credit every achievement to this confidence, along with the creativity and empathy I gained from performing.

In university, I have set out to explore other aspects of theatre apart from being onstage. If theatre was so important to me, it must be important to the rest of the world. Therefore, I am particularly interested in theatre’s place in society. How has society valued theatre throughout history? If part of theatre’s value today is commercial, does commercialization play a part in keeping theatre alive and thriving? Can theatre be a successful commercial venture without sacrificing artistic merit?

The Destination Theatre course explores theatre’s place in the world from a number of perspectives. I hope Destination Theatre will help me answer all of my questions but most importantly, where does theatre fit within modern society and where do I fit within the theatre world? What is my role in helping theatre evolve sustainably in today’s rapidly changing world?

This course will be my third time visiting London, England. Previously, I have learned about London’s history and visited the tourist destinations but I have yet to delve deeper into London’s rich culture. While I have seen an American musical in the West End, Destination Theatre will allow me to explore the local artistry rooted in England’s long history. For example, I am thrilled to visit The Royal Shakespeare Company and understand how artists through the centuries have kept Shakespeare’s work and memory alive. I am also excited to visit the “Peopling the Palace” festival and interact with unique, local art. I cannot wait to return to London and I could not think of a better place to study the past, the present, and the future of theatre.

Rachael DiMenna is a fourth year student pursuing a dual degree with the School for Advanced Studies in Arts and Humanities and the Ivey Business School. She studies literature, business administration, languages, entrepreneurship, and other fields through an interdisciplinary lens.